DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

BORDER WARS
Oliver W. Fannin August 27, 1918

James Flavian Lavery August 27, 1918

WWII
Stanley R “Swede” Larson January 1943
KOREA

James H. Jefferson* July 21, 1950

Earl K Jackson* September 1, 1950

John C. Hughes September 3, 1950

Paul L. Robison* September 15, 1950

Emmette E. Forrester September 15, 1951

Bernard George Teeters September 19-20, 1950

Harold Perry* September 23, 1950

John C. Hughes November 27, 1950

Richard F Lauer March 7, 1951

John M. Dilieto May 20, 1951

Robert Donald Ivison May 20, 1951

Willis Jackson May 21, 1951

Thomas Davis Morgan November 19, 1951

James E. Roberts July 1, 1953

 
VIETNAM
2Lt Jasper D Sturdivant* July 3, 1966 Sgt Clifford R Totten July 3. 1966 SSgt Gregorio M Garcia* July 31, 1966
Pfc Gary G Rushing* October 27, 1966 LTC Robert C Kingston November 22-24, 1966 Sp4 Daniel F Perez Jr* March 12, 1967
Sp4 Wendell T Meade March 12-13, 1967 Pfc Thomas Minogue* March 21, 1967 SSgt James H Hill Jr May 20, 1967
Sp4 Ronald J Hopkins February 9, 1968 Sp4 Tomothy D Boris April 3, 1968 Cpt George C D'Avignon April 15, 1968
Sp4 Jesus H Guevara September 27, 1968 SFC Dale F Rollins* November 13, 1968 Sgt Daniel M Noeldner* Mar 6, 1969
     

AWARD CITATIONS

Oliver W. Fannin

August 27, 1918

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Mexican Border Wars

Service: Army

Rank: First Lieutenant

Division: 29th Division

GENERAL ORDERS: War Department, General Orders No. 44 (1919), Amended Supplement 1

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Oliver W. Fannin, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving with 29th Division, in action in an engagement with hostile Mexicans at Nogales, Arizona, 27 August 1918, while commanding the guard, 35th U.S. Infantry.

 

James Flavian Lavery

August 27, 1918

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Mexican Border Wars

Service: Army

Rank: Private First Class

Division: Quartermaster Corps

GENERAL ORDERS: War Department, General Orders No. 9 (1923)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Private First Class James Flavian Lavery, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with Quartermaster Corps, during an engagement with hostile Mexicans at Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, on the 27th of August, 1918. Private Lavery, braving the heaviest fire, repeatedly entered the zone of fire with his motor truck and carried wounded men to places of safety, thereby saving the lives of several soldiers.

 

Stanley Robert “Swede” Larson

January 1943

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING World War II

Service: Army

Battalion: Infantry Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS:

Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the South Pacific Area, General Orders No. 47 (1943)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Major (Infantry) Stanley Robert Larsen (ASN: 0-22094), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of an Infantry Battalion of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces at Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, in January 1943. Major Larsen assumed command on 16 January 1943 of a battalion which had recently suffered heavy casualties. Under exceptionally trying circumstances Major Larsen, by superior leadership, unusual initiative and great personal force, succeeded in welding the battalion into a compact fighting unit, imbued with confidence and determination to annihilate the Japanese who were occupying a strongly, closely coordinated strong point on a heavily wooded jungle ridge. This enemy position, composed of 40 machine gun emplacements, had held against a three-week attack of an infantry regiment, and constant pressure over two weeks by an infantry battalion. Major Larsen, employing plans based on thorough, personal and hazardous reconnaissance of the front line, directed the reduction of all enemy resistance in this area to a successful conclusion. During the mopping up stage of the campaign, Major Larsen voluntarily and personally led several patrols into the Gifu strong-point position. With utter disregard for personal safety, he at all times led the patrol at the point. He displayed extraordinary heroism in all actions and narrowly escaped being shot several times, once at point blank range by a Japanese officer. He captured one prisoner and personally killed four of the enemy. His fearless leadership at this time restored confidence, the offensive spirit and desire to kill, in officers and men alike. Major Larsen's heroic leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

 

John C. Hughes

September 3, 1950

John Hughes earned his first Distinguished Service Cross in Korea on September 3, 1950. Two months later on November 27, he earned a SECOND Distinguished Service Cross.

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Captain

Battalion: 3d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS:

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 13, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Captain (Infantry) John C. Hughes (ASN: 0-58930), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chuam, Korea, on 3 September 1950. Within a six hour period, Captain Hughes' company was attacked five times by a battalion of the enemy. When the communications, disrupted by enemy fire, made the loss of centralized control imminent, Captain Hughes, disregarding his personal safety and exposing himself to enemy fire, ran from position to position directing and supervising the fire being placed on the enemy. His fearlessness and the manner in which he repeatedly braved the incessant rain of bullets and shell fragments in order to coordinate the Company's fire power were the prime factors in repelling the five attacks and achieving an overwhelming victory.

 

John C. Hughes

November 27, 1950

John Hughes earned his first Distinguished Service Cross in Korea on September 3, 1950.

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Captain

Battalion: 3d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS:

Department of the Army, General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Captain (Infantry) John C. Hughes (ASN: 0-58930), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Ung-Pong, Korea, on 27 November 1950. Learning of an enemy breach through the right flank of his company's sector which, seriously threatened the perimeter, Captain Hughes led a small force up a slope through mortar, grenade, and small-arms fire. Although wounded, he refused medical aid, gained the crest of the ridge, and recaptured a portion of the lost ground. Later, when enemy machine-gun fire raked his unit, he led a daring charge on the emplacement which annihilated the hostile crew with grenade and rifle fire and routed the remaining enemy from the ridge. Captain Hughes remained on the perimeter, repeatedly exposed himself to heavy fire to direct the defense until daylight, and refused evacuation until assured that the enemy attack was definitely repulsed. The indomitable fighting spirit, intense loyalty to his unit, and outstanding leadership displayed by Captain Hughes during his heroic exploits reflect the highest credit on himself and the Infantry and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the United States Army.

 

Bernard George Teeters

September 19-20, 1950

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Lieutenant Colonel

Battalion: 1st Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS:

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Bernard George Teeters, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Teeters distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 19 and 20 September 1950. Colonel Teeters' battalion launched an attack on Chungam-ni, the initial battalion objective in the Pusan perimeter breakthrough. A ridge occupied by a numerically superior, fanatical, and determined enemy commanded the approach. At 0800 hours on 19 September 1950, immediately upon crossing the line of departure, the attacking elements as well as the battalion command post and the reserve company were subjected to intense and uncannily accurate machine-gun, artillery, and mortar fire. When it became apparent that the attack was faltering and many casualties were imminent, Colonel Teeters purposely rose from his position of safety, exposing himself to the enemy with the view of instilling courage and aggressiveness in the wavering attack elements. The attacking force, inspired by his action, rallied and pressed forward. He then calmly moved forward with the lead attacking elements and, in full view of the enemy, directed and coordinated the attack. As a result of his skillful, heroic, and inspirational leadership, the strategic ridge was secured and many of the enemy were killed. On the morning of 20 September 1950, he prepared and coordinated an attack plan for the final assault upon Chungam-ni. As the lead elements prepared to launch their attack, the enemy again concentrated a furious and withering blanket of artillery fire on the position. Colonel Teeters, again moved from his position of safety and, with utter disregard for the hostile fire, reconnoitered a relatively safe route which enabled the companies to advance with a minimum of casualties. The skillful leadership, calmness, and confidence displayed by Colonel Teeters contributed immeasurably to the successful accomplishment of the battalion's mission. 

Emmette E. Forrester

September 15, 1950

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Corporal

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 186 (April 4, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Corporal Emmette E. Forrester (ASN: RA-18102246), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Forrester distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chirwan-ni, Korea, on 15 September 1950. While occupying a defensive position overlooking the Nam River, Company F was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Under cover of intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, the enemy approached within grenade distance of the company positions and succeeded in knocking out two friendly machine-gun emplacements. When it became apparent that the company would not be able to hold its position against the overwhelming enemy attack, the order was given for the company to withdraw. Corporal Forrester and a comrade volunteered to remain in position and cover the withdrawal. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained exposed to the deadly hail of enemy fire and courageously held the enemy at bay until he was killed. 

Willis Jackson

May 21, 1951

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: First Lieutenant

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 708 (September 19, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Willis Jackson (ASN: 0-1335009), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 21 May 1951. On that date, Company F was assigned the mission of securing Hill 329 from a well-entrenched and fanatically determined enemy. Lieutenant Jackson was leading one of the assault platoons up the slope when a sudden burst of intense and accurate automatic-weapons fire from the enemy emplacement halted his men in an exposed area, pinning them down and painfully wounding Lieutenant Jackson. As friendly artillery began to bombard the hostile position, the platoon renewed its attack and fought fiercely for two hours until enemy fire from the crest of the hill became so intense that they were pinned down once more. In an effort to rally his men into making a final sweeping assault against the hilltop, Lieutenant Jackson single-handedly charged an enemy position and, despite his wound, wrested an enemy soldier's own weapon from him and beat him to death with it. This courageous action so inspired Lieutenant Jackson's men that they charged forward, overrunning the enemy emplacements. As the enemy fled in wild disorder down the reverse slope of the hill, Lieutenant Jackson pitched grenades after them and then succeeded in killing three more of the enemy with his rifle. Despite his painful wound, he organized his men in a defense against a counterattack and only fell back to be treated when the company commander ordered him to do so. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Jackson reflect great credit on himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. 

Robert Donald Ivison

May 20, 1951

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private First Class

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 615 (August 5, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private First Class Robert Donald Ivison (ASN: RA-12284786), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Ivison distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chonjo-ri, Korea, on 20 May 1951. On that date, Private Ivison's company was given the mission of attacking and securing the position of a well-entrenched and fanatically determined enemy force holding Hill 198. Moving in a frontal assault up the hill, the unit was pinned down by intense and accurate enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. As the enemy began to roll grenades down among the group, Private Ivison, observing that both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant had been wounded, realized that his comrades must move from their precarious position on the slope or face annihilation. Jumping up from his position, he rushed through the accurate, point-blank enemy fire toward a hostile machine-gun emplacement, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades and urging them forward. With his automatic rifle, he killed the two enemy machine gunners and, although mortally wounded in his charge up the hill, he continued to fire at the now retreating enemy. His actions so inspired his comrades that they charged up the slope, routing the enemy from their position. 

James H. Jefferson*

July 21, 1950

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private First Class

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 15 (August 1, 1950)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private First Class James H. Jefferson (ASN: RA-15274687), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Jefferson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 21 July 1950. On that date positions of the 2d platoon, Company F, became untenable due to penetration by numerically superior enemy forces. Private First Class Jefferson, without regard to his personal safety, voluntarily remained in his position to cover the withdrawal of his platoon. He delivered a volume of accurate automatic rifle fire on the enemy, slowing the enemy and enabling the rest of his platoon to successfully withdrawal to new positions. In this heroic action Private First Class Jefferson was killed. 

Paul L. Robison*

September 15, 1950

Corporal Emmette Forrester, who was Private Robison's companion in this action, also received a posthumous award of the Distinguished Service Cross for his sacrifice in this action.

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 186 (April 4, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private Paul L. Robison (ASN: RA-16310479), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Robison distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chirwan-ni, Korea, on 15 September 1950. While occupying a defensive position along the Nam River, Company F was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Under cover of intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, the enemy approached to within grenade range of the company positions and succeeded in knocking out two friendly machine-gun emplacements. When it became obvious that the company would not be able to hold its positions against the overwhelming enemy attack, the order was given for the company to withdraw. Private Robison and a comrade volunteered to remain in position and cover the withdrawal of the company. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained exposed to the deadly hail of enemy fire and courageously held the enemy at bay until he was killed. 

John M. Dilieto

May 20, 1951

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private First Class

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 633 (August 12, 1951)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Private First Class John M. Dilieto, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Dilieto distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 20 May 1951. On that date, Private Dilieto's platoon launched an assault against a well-entrenched and determined enemy force on Hill 420. Moving his machine-gun through heavy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, he constantly raked the enemy with a steady stream of fire, forcing them to cover. After a series of forward displacements, his machine-gun developed a stoppage, thus enabling the enemy to take the initiative and halt the attack with a devastating barrage of machine-gun fire and grenades. Discarding the machine gun, he advanced with only his carbine and, despite the heavy volume of enemy fire, destroyed the main enemy strongpoint. Pressing on to the crest of the hill, he attacked another emplacement, but his weapon failed to function. Using his carbine as a club, he leaped into the foxhole and killed its occupants. His bold action enabled his comrades to renew the assault and drive the remaining enemy from the objective. 

James E. Roberts

July 1, 1953

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Master Sergeant

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 738 (August 11, 1953)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Master Sergeant James E. Roberts (ASN: RA-14027367), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces while leading a night patrol in the vicinity of Majang-ni, Korea, on 1 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Roberts led a fourteen-man patrol to a point approximately 2,800 yards from the main line of resistance to establish an ambush. While Sergeant Roberts was engaged in deploying his men in the most advantageous fighting positions, the patrol was fired upon by a concealed enemy force of platoon strength. After signaling for aid, Sergeant Roberts moved forward to meet the enemy. When he was attacked by several hostile soldiers his rifle was wrested from him, but he continued to fight with his bare hands. Although wounded several times in the head and legs, Sergeant Roberts took a weapon from the enemy and killed three of his attackers. Exhausted from the bitter fight and weakened by loss of blood, Sergeant Roberts was placed on a stretcher for evacuation. As he was being carried from the area, he continued to should directions and words of encouragement to his men.

 

Thomas Davis Morgan

November 19, 1951

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: First Lieutenant

Battalion: 3d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 15 (January 7, 1952)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Thomas Davis Morgan (ASN: 0-2017887), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Morgan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 19 November 1951. On that date Lieutenant Morgan led his platoon in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. As the friendly force advanced toward their objective, they were subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire. With a total disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Morgan moved through the devastating fire, fearlessly directing his the fire of his men and constantly urging them forward. When the advance was halted by a stubborn group of enemy soldiers firing a machine-gun from an almost inaccessible bunker, Lieutenant Morgan unhesitatingly moved across the fire-swept terrain and single-handedly neutralized the bunker and took three prisoners. During this courageous assault he was painfully wounded, but he refused to leave his men. Instead, he directed the men holding their positions against the hostile force which was preparing to attack in an effort to drive the platoon from the hill. In a heavy mortar barrage which preceded the hostile attack, Lieutenant Morgan was again wounded. At this time several of his men offered to brave the enemy fire in order to evacuate him. Not wishing to endanger the lives of his men, Lieutenant Morgan ordered them to fall back to more tenable positions without him. He was last seen occupying a forward emplacement, still shouting directions to his men as they withdrew. In the hostile attack which followed, this position was overrun by the numerically superior enemy. 

Richard F Lauer

March 7, 1951

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Battalion: 1st Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Department of the Army: General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard F. Lauer, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Lauer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Han River in Korea on 7 March 1951. Following an assault landing across the river by his company, the assault platoon became subjected to intense hostile fire from a small hill some five hundred yards to the east. Ordered up the river to draw enemy fire and relieve pressure on the assault platoon, he deployed his platoon and opened fire, only to be pinned by a vicious cross-fire from two machine guns, approximately seventy-five yards distant. Running forty yards through the fire-swept area, Lieutenant Lauer secured a rifle and grenade adapter, crawled closer and fired two grenades into the position on the right which knocked it out. When the gun on the left again pinned down his platoon, he advanced alone and fired three grenades into this hostile emplacement which due to its construction, proved ineffective. Circling the emplacement, he bayoneted an enemy soldier who was firing on his platoon and, dropping a grenade into the escape vent, silenced the gun and annihilated its crew. Leaping to his feet and shouting orders to fix bayonets and charge, his men, so inspired by his heroic action, made a frontal assault against the hill, killed twenty-one hostile troops and completely routed their remaining force. Lieutenant Lauer, in his daring exploits, had personally knocked out two machine guns and killed five of the determined enemy. His courageous conduct, indomitable determination and outstanding combat leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself, and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the infantry and United States Army.

 
 

Harold Perry*

September 23, 1950

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private

Battalion: 2nd Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 159 (March 21, 1951)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold Perry (RA13343537), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Perry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 23 September 1950. On that date, Company G had launched an attack against heavily fortified positions near Haman and, while advancing on the objective, received withering small-arms and machine-gun fire which pinned the company down and stalled the advance. Private Perry, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continued to advance alone in the face of the intense enemy fire. Reaching the enemy positions, he crawled from foxhole to foxhole, killing the enemy in each with grenades and rifle fire. After killing seven enemy soldiers, he was hit by enemy fire and mortally wounded. His heroic action resulted in the saving of numerous lives and so inspired is comrades that they moved forward aggressively, and swiftly accomplished the unit's mission.

 
 

Earl K Jackson*

September 1, 1950

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: Distinguished Service Cross

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS DURING: Korean War

Service: Army

Rank: Private

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Division: 25th Infantry Division

GENERAL ORDERS: General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 206 (August 14, 1951)

Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl K. Jackson (RA16264890), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kube-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1950. Private Jackson's platoon, in defensive positions on a strategic hill, was viciously attacked in the early morning hours by a numerically superior hostile force supported by intense automatic weapons and grenade fire. The fanatical assailants swarmed up the hill, overran several individual positions, and ferocious hand-to-hand combat ensued. During the encounter, an enemy grenade was thrown within two feet of the emplacement occupied by Private Jackson and two comrades. Without hesitation, he jumped out of the foxhole, grabbed the grenade, and hurled it back, wounding one of the enemy. Then, while in another foxhole with three soldiers, a grenade was thrown into the position. Fully realizing the odds against him, Private Jackson threw himself on it, absorbing the full force of the explosion with his body. Private Jackson was mortally wounded in this fearless display of valor, but his willing self-sacrifice saved several of his comrades from death or serious injury and imbued the members of his company with indomitable resolution to repel the ruthless foe.

 

2Lt Jasper D Sturdivant*

Headquarters

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96307

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 5894 3 October 1966

1. TC 320. The Distinguished Service Cross is AWARDED posthumously to:

STURDIVANT, JASPER D 0326494 SECOND LIEUTENANT INFANTRY United States Army, Co B. 1st Bn, 35th Inf, 3rd Bde, 25th Inf Div, APO 96355.

Date Action: 3 July 1966

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 3 July 19661 Second Lieutenant Sturdivant was leading a two squad patrol during a search and destroy mission near Thang Duc. When his unit received intense hostile fire from a reinforced Viet Cong company, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant and many of his men were seriously wounded. As the insurgent onslaught continued, a portion of his hasty defense was overrun and the remainder of his force was surrounded. Despite the severity of his wounds and repeated attacks by the fanatical Viet Cong, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant rallied his isolated force, radioed for reinforcements, and continued to direct and encourage his comrades. Realizing that his force was bout to be overrun, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant, with complete disregard for his safety, called artillery fire onto his own position in an effort to break the encirclement. He continued to operate the radio and fire his weapon until his ammunition was expended. Fully aware that he was critically wounded. Second Lieutenant Sturdivant disassembled his weapon placed the bolt under his body, and died. Second Lieutenant Sturdivant’s extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Sgt Clifford R Totten

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APC San Francisco 96307

GENERAL ORDERS  NUMBER 5803 26 September 1966

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced. Distinguished Service Cross

TOTTEN, CLIFFORD R SERGEANT E-5 United States Army Co B, 1st Bn, 35th Inf, 3d Bde 25th Inf Div, APO 96355.

Date Action: 3 July 1966

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For Extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Totten distinguished himself on 3 July 1966 while serving as artillery forward observer for a two squad patrol near Thang Duc. When his patrol received intense hostile fire from an estimated company of Viet Cong. a portion of the patrol was overrun and the reminder surrounded. Observing that he was about to be overrun himself, Sergeant Totten, with complete disregard for his safety, called in an uninterrupted barrage of artillery fire on his own position for a period of three hours. When his platoon leader was killed, Sergeant Totten immediately assumed command of the remaining men and organized a tight defensive perimeter. When their ammunition was expended, Sergeant Totten and one of his comrades dashed onto the battlefield to collect more. On five occasions during the repeated attacks on the perimeter, Sergeant Totten fearlessly picked up Viet Cong grenades and threw them back at the fanatical insurgents. A sixth hostile grenade exploded and wounded him in the arm. When reinforcements arrived, he pointed out the location of his men as well as nearby Viet Cong replacements. Sergeant Totten left the area after his seriously wounded comrades had been safely evacuated. Sergeant Totten’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United states Army.

 

Sgt Gregorio M Garcia*

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96307

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 6143 25 October 1966 

1. TC 320, The Distinguished Service Cross is AWARDED posthumously to:

GARCIA, GREGORIO M RA56296200 STAFF SERGEANT E6 United States ARMY Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, APO 96355

Date action: 31 July 1966

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason:. For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam.

Staff Sergeant Garcia distinguished himself on 31 July 1966 while leading a reconnaissance and security element to his platoon’s front during a search and destroy mission. While executing their mission, Staff Sergeant Garcia’s unit received intense hostile fire from a Viet Cong company. To prevent the insurgents from executing a flanking maneuver to his right, Staff Sergeant Garcia skillfully maneuvered his men to the left. Although the Viet Cong fire became increasingly intense he led his men forward. As a result, he gave the rest of his platoon and company time and space to organize and maneuver. Throughout the movement forward, Staff Sergeant Garcia continually moved from position to position, giving instructions and encouragement to his comrades. As the platoon maneuver began to take form, an insurgent antitank grenade launcher began to deliver accurate fire to the immediate front of Staff Sergeant Garcia’s unit. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Staff Sergeant Garcia immediately organized and personally led his team toward the hostile emplacement. While the remainder of his team provided a base of cover, Staff Sergeant Garcia, with complete disregard for his safety, singlehandedly charged the Viet Cong position. Throwing hand grenades with accuracy, he killed one Viet Cong and forced the insurgents to withdraw and abandon their antitank weapon. As his platoon pressed the attack, they again became pinned down by intense hostile fire, Staff Sergeant Garcia immediately led. his team and employed fire and maneuver tactics. Although he was seriously wounded, Staff Sergeant Garcia continued to aggressively attack until he was mortally wounded. Through his courage and outstanding leadership, he contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission, Staff Sergeant Garcia’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United Stated Army.

 

Pfc Gary G Rushing*

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96307

 

GENERAL ORDERS NO 3134 24 June 1967

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced posthumously.

RUSHING, GARY G RA14872076 PRIVATE FIRST CLASS E3 United States Army Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade Task Force, 25th Infantry Division, APO 96355

Awarded:. Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 27 October 1966

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Private First Class Rushing distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 October 1966 while serving as pointman with a platoon of the 35th Infantry on a search and destroy mission. Leading the unit out of the landing zone, Private Rushing alertly spotted and fired on two North Vietnamese soldiers ahead of him. After mortar fire was placed in the area to their front, Private Rushing again took the point. When he suddenly received hostile sniper fire, he dauntlessly returned the fire, allowing the platoon time to deploy just before the entire area erupted into a fierce battle. When a soldier’s rifle jammed, Private Rushing daringly exposed himself, ran to the man’s side and provided covering fire until the weapon was repaired. Then, as the enemy began to assault from another direction, he fearlessly shed his cumbersome web gear, picked up his grenades and advanced alone through the dense undergrowth. Disregarding the intense hostile fire directed at him, Private Rushing continued to charge while firing his weapon and throwing grenades. Through his courageous actions he killed three insurgents and inspired his comrades to rout the enemy; however, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire as he attempted to return for more ammunition. Private First Class Rushing’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

LTC Robert C Kingston

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96307

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 7024 25 December 1966

1 TC 32O The following AWARD is announced:

KINGSTON, ROBERT C 071534 LIEUTENANT COLONEL INFANTRY United States Army, Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, APO 96355

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 22 November 1966 to 24 November 1966

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Lieutenant Colonel Kingston distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 22 November 1966 to 24 November 1966 while commanding elements of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Division on a search and destroy mission. When two of his companies made contact with the forward positions of a Viet Cong battalion, Colonel Kingston landed by helicopter and assumed control of ground operations. In the evening of 22 November 1966 when the lead company was pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire, Colonel Kingston, with complete disregard for his safety, charged a wounded Viet Cong and wrestled a weapon from him. While firing the captured weapon, he then led an assault on the hostile positions and forced the insurgents to flee. Throughout the three day period, Colonel Kingston repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire, to encourage his troops and direct air strikes and artillery against the Viet Cong emplacements. His aggressive leadership and personal courage inspired his men to fight with renewed vigor and defeat the numerically superior hostile force. Colonel Kingston’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Sp4 Daniel F Perez Jr.*

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS  NUMBER 4666 14 September 1967

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced posthumously.

PEREZ, DANIEL F JR US54369072 SPECIALIST FOUR E4 United States Army Company A, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 12 March 1967

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Four Perez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1967 while serving as machine gunner of an infantry platoon on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. The platoon engaged and killed two hostile soldiers but when one man moved forward to search the area, he was seriously wounded by intense enemy fire. Without regard for his own safety, Specialist Perez rushed forward and directed a heavy volume of accurate fire into the enemy positions. Remaining exposed, he fought off repeated attempts by the enemy to reach his comrade. An enemy’ grenade wounded. him seriously but he continued to repel numerous hostile assaults. During a lull in the battle, Specialist Perez dashed to retrieve his fallen friend. He then continued to fight courageously until the enemy broke contact. He gave his life while gallantly fighting to protect his comrades in the face of grave danger. Specialist Four Perez’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Sp4 Wendell T Meade

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 4476 2 September 1967

1 TC 320. The following AWARD is announced

MEADE, WENDELL T US52679909 SPECIALIST FOUR E4 United States Army Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 12 March 1967 to 13 March 1967

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam Specialist Four Meade (then Private First Class) distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March and 13 March 1967 while serving as medical aidman for an infantry platoon on a combat mission near the Cambodian border. Specialist Meade’s platoon was on its way to relieve another unit engaged with a numerically superior Viet Cong force when it made contact with the enemy. Weaponless because of his religious beliefs, he braved withering enemy fire to aid his critically wounded platoon leader. Time after time he disregarded his own safety to crawl across the bullet-swept area between his platoon and the enemy positions to administer to his stricken comrades. When half the platoon fell back to a more secure position, Specialist Meade remained behind to supervise evacuation of the wounded. At the new position he exposed himself repeatedly to enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire to build a shelter for the casualties. Although seriously wounded while moving to aid an injured comrade, he ignored his injury until treatment of the other man was completed. He continued to move along the perimeter treating the wounded throughout the night and refused evacuation the next morning until all others had been cared for. Specialist Four Meade’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Pfc Thomas Minogue*

The President of the United states of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 25, 1963, has awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, posthumously, to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS THOMAS MINOGUE, UNITE STATES ARMY

for extraordinary heroism in action:

Private First Class Thomas Minogue distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism on 21 March 1967, while serving as Platoon Medic for the Third Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry. His unit was conducting a search and destroy operation in Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam and engaged a numerically superior enemy force. When the company commander was seriously wounded, Private Minogue ran through thirty meters of intense enemy fire to shield his commander with his body and treat his wounds. As the enemy charged the position, he ignored the intrinsic peril and threw himself across his leader and consequently received multiple gunshot wounds. His selfless actions also provided protection for the Radio Telephone Operator, who used his rifle and hand grenades to repulse the enemy and communicated with the platoons and battalion headquarters. Private Minogue continued to shield his commander as he and the Radio Telephone Operator moved him to a safer position. When the enemy assaulted their new position, he again covered the commander’s body with his own and protected the Radio Telephone Operator. The company commander occasionally regained consciousness long enough to encourage his men and adjust air and artillery support. Private Minogue continued to treat him until overcome by his own mortal wounds. His extraordinary heroism not only saved the lives of the Radio Operator end Company Commander, but also made it possible for them to continue to operate the Command Posy. The tactical and valorous significance of his heroism is highlighted by the fact that without the operation of the Command Post, the company would not have survived until a relief force arrived to force the enemy to break contact. Private Minogue’s supreme effort and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Armed Forces of his country.

 

SSgt James H Hill Jr.

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 4966 28 September 1967

1. TC 320, The following AWARD is announced.

HILL, JAMES H JR RA13751576 STAFF SERGEANT E6 United States Army Company A, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3rd Brigade Task Force, 25th Infantry Division APO 96225

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 20 May 1967

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Staff Sergeant Hill distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 May 1967 while serving as squad leader of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission near Duc Pho. Sergeant Hill’s platoon was working with engineers clearing and destroying bunkers when they came under intense sniper fire from a bunker complex built into a nearby hill. Reacting immediately, he charged through unwavering fire across forty meters of open terrain to the closest bunker. He jumped on top of the bunker and threw a grenade through the firing port killing the insurgents inside. With firing concentrated on him from all directions, he dashed to the next bunker and climbed atop it. Seriously wounded by the deadly fire, he dropped a grenade inside and moved to the next bunker. Ignoring his injury, he again exposed himself to the Viet Cong snipers as he jumped on top of the third bunker and destroyed it with another grenade. Only after he was sure that the enemy was defeated did he allow himself to be evacuated. His courageous actions were responsible for saving many lives and contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Staff Sergeant Hill’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Sp4 Ronald J Hopkins

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS, UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 3763 2 August 1968

1. TC 320. The following AWARD Is announced.

HOPKINS, RONALD J US56827957 SPECIALIST FOUR E4 United States Army, Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 9 February 1968

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Hopkins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1968 as point man of his Infantry unit during a search and destroy mission near Da Nang. His squad was assigned as point squad for an attack against an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese Regulars. The initial hostile fire was so intense that Specialist Hopkins’ platoon was forced to withdraw and re-group in a shallow trench line. He then led his squad along the ditch until it encountered an enemy machine gun emplacement which he neutralized, enabling the platoon to advance. The friendly force came under fire from a second machine gun position. Specialist Hopkins moved forward, eliminated the emplacement and captured the weapon. The insurgents then employed, mortar fire against his element. Unhesitantly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he advanced through a hail of shrapnel and small arms fire. He routed the North Vietnamese mortar crew and captured the weapon and its ammunition. As the battle continued, Specialist Hopkins saved a fellow soldier from possible injury or death by knocking him to the ground when the man failed to react to an enemy hand grenade that landed near his position. Specialist Four Hopkins’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Sp4 Timothy D Boris

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS, UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 3369 16 July 1968

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced.

BORIS, TIMOTHY D US54605994 SPECIALIST FOUR E4 United States Army, Company D, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 3 April 1968

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Four Boris distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 April 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company during a search and destroy mission. The company came under sudden, intense automatic weapons and mortar fire resulting in several casualties being trapped in the open. Abandoning the relative safety of his position, Specialist Boris rushed to aid one of his fallen comrades. He was wounded in the leg, but managed to move the injured soldier to safety and administer first aid. He again moved through a hail of bullets into the open to rescue another casualty, and he was wounded a second time as he carried the man to safety. Specialist Boris attempted a third rescue. As he crawled toward the injured man, he received a third wound which completely immobilized him and caused him to be evacuated. Specialist Four Boris’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

Cpt. George C D'Avignon

D’AVIGNON, GEORGE C 05315074 CAPTAIN INFANTRY United States Army Company D, 1st Bn, 35th Inf, 3d Bde, 4th Inf Div APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross Date action: 15 April 1968 Theater: Vietnam

CITATION

Captain George C. D’Avignon, 05315074. distinguished himself in combat operations against an armed hostile force on or about 1400 hours, 15 April 1968, west of Kontum City, Republic of Vietnam. Captain D’Avignon, Company Commander, Company D, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, was with his unit while engaged in combat operations with an estimated North Vietnamese reinforced company.

Early on the afternoon of 15 April, Captain D’Avignon was directed to maneuver his company to the aid of Charlie Company which was then engaged in extremely heavy contact approximately one thousand meters north of the battalion fire base. Captain D’Avignon immediately alerted his three rifle platoons for movement to the abttle. As the three platoons and Captain D’Avignon neared the contact area, they received intense hostile fire from their flank, front, rear and plunging fire from snipers located in the trees. The enemy had at their disposal small arms, automatic weapons, light machine guns, rockets, and mortars, all of which they were employing effectively. Captain D’Avignon maneuvered his third platoon forward and commanded his first and second platoons to set up a defensive line to the rear of Charlie Company leaving an opening in the center. This later proved to be the only escape route for the badly hit company and insured their safe return to the perimeter taking the least number of casualties possible. At this time, Captain D’Avignon moved forward with his third platoon, charging the enemy positions. While advancing, Captain D’Avignon was hit in the thighs by rounds from an enemy machine gun position. Still in complete control of himself and his company, Captain D’Avignon continued moving forward, leading a devastating attack on the enemy positions. As he was moving forward, an enemy sniper fired two rounds which struck Captain D’Avignon in the back and exited through his stomach, causing a massive open cavity in his lower abdomen. Although seriously wounded, he continued leading his men. As Captain D’Avignon advanced, he reached an enemy machine gun position that was putting out a devastating amount of fire and causing several elements of his company to be pinned down. After reaching the machine gun position, Captain D’Avignon fired four rounds from his pump shotgun, killing the four members of the machine gun crew and destroying the weapon. While returning to the second platoon location, Captain D’Avignon spotted several seriously wounded members of his unit. Rushing to their aid, he immediately started giving first aid until medics could be summoned. As Captain D’Avignon was tending to one wounded man, another enemy sniper shot rang out striking Captain D’Avignon in the right shoulder. By this time, Captain D’Avignon had lost so much blood that he was unable to get to his unit. As the medics came, he redirected them to other wounded men. He made sure that all of the wounded had been taken to safety and then allowed the medics to treat and evacuate him. Although seriously wounded and in great pain, Captain D’Avignon refused to give up, maintaining command of his unit until he was sure that all the wounded had been evacuated. As a result of Captain D’Avignon’s fearless and professional actions, countless lives were saved and the morale and fighting effectiveness of his unit were boosted. Despite suffering four killed and sixteen wounded, Company D remained a solid, effective fighting force, inflicting severe casualties upon the enemy. Captain D’Avignons personal bravery, devotion to duty, and endurance are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, our efforts in, Vietnam, and the United States Army. 

Sp4 Jesus H Guevara

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS, UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

 

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 82 9 January 1969

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced.

GUEVARA, JESUS H US54720906 SPECIALIST FOUR United States Army, Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 27 September 1968

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Guevara distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 September 1968 while serving as a radio telephone operator on a five man listening and observation patrol southeast of Duc Lap. North Vietnamese Army troops occupying a well camouflaged bunker complex opened fire on his small element, instantly killing the patrol leader. Specialist Guevara immediately took command, directing the men into a defensive position while providing covering fire. He also contacted his company, giving details of his unit’s location and the strength of the enemy. The communists assaulted and killed another member of the patrol, but were driven back. After a second attempt to overrun the Americans, during which Specialist Guevara killed two North Vietnamese, the aggressors withdrew slightly and unleashed a barrage of automatic weapons fire and grenades. A grenade landed in his position and he fearlessly picked it up and threw it back at the enemy. When a second grenade fell amid the three patrol members, he again grabbed it and attempted to throw it, but the deadly missile exploded before he released it. Specialist Guevara absorbed most of the impact from the grenade and received further injuries from a smoke grenade which was detonated by the explosion. Despite his grievous wounds, he tried to reach his radio to report the action. Through his efforts, he and his two comrades were able to hold off the aggressors until relief arrived. Specialist Four Guevara’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

 

SFC Dale F Rollins*

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS, UNITED STATES ARMY VIETNAM

APO San Francisco 96375

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 291 25 January 1969

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced posthumously.

ROLLINS, DALE F RA19467203 SSAN 516-36-3191 SERGEANT FIRST CLASS United States Army, Company A, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, APO 96262

Awarded: Distinguished Service Cross

Date action: 13 November 1968

Theater: Republic of Vietnam

Reason: For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Sergeant First Class Rollins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 November 1968 as first sergeant of an infantry company at Fire Base Vera. When his unit came under an intense enemy mortar and rocket attack, Sergeant Rollins unhesitatingly left the safety of the command bunker and moved through the hostile barrage to check the bunker line and render aid and encouragement to the wounded. Finding a critically injured officer, he treated the man’s wounds and had him taken to the helicopter pad for immediate evacuation. He next went to a section of the perimeter which was receiving heavy small arms and grenade fire. When he arrived he spotted and killed a North Vietnamese soldier who had breached the perimeter. After warning the bunker line that the aggressors bad broken through the defensive wire, he spotted four more enemy troops. Alerting a fellow soldier to their location, Sergeant Rollins approached and spoke to them In Vietnamese. Confused by his action, the communists exposed themselves and were killed by him and his comrade. One of the enemy who had crossed the perimeter opened fire from the rear, mortally wounding Sergeant Rollins. Sergeant First Class Rollins’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Sgt Daniel M Noeldner*

HEADQUARTERS

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

WASHINGTON, DC

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 85 15 December 1969

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 25 July 1963, the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action, is awarded posthumously to:

Sergeant Daniel M. Noeldner, United States Army, who distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism while serving as a senior medical aidman assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, near Pleiku, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 March 1969. On that day Sergeant Noeldner was serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, when it was ambushed by a force of the North Vietnamese Army. Several men in the point element were hit by the initial volley of fire and the cry for "Medic" was heard. Completely disregarding the intensity of the enemy attack and his own safety, Sergeant Noeldner rushed forward to the side of his wounded comrades. While treating the first man that he reached, he was wounded in the thigh. Refusing medical treatment for himself, he continued to assist the wounded while repeatedly exposing himself to the fire of the enemy force. Shortly thereafter he was again hit by enemy rounds while assisting his fellow soldiers. While attempting to bandage himself to stop the profuse bleeding another medic came to his aid, but Sergeant Noeldner directed him to check the other injured men. Although the crippling effect of his wounds prevented him from continuing his gallant mission, Sergeant Noeldner had significantly contributed to saving the lives of two men at the sacrifice of his own. His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, was in keeping with the highest traditions of time United States Army and reflects great credit upon him and the Armed Forces of his country.